fall 2020.
american parents last chance to tell public servants to stop lying- let me explain with the case of pre-computing maths- q1 why were americans worst at teaching this? 2 how was computing designed by best maths guys? 3 what purposes could computers humanise- long version read biography of von neumann by macrae, short version here.
amazon & NORTH AMERICA: Canada, Mexico, United States (billionnaires)
MIDDLE AMERICA: Antigua & Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent & the Grenadines, Trinidad & Tobago
SOUTH AMERICA: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela.... associate webs economistlearning.com economistbank.com economisthealth.com
Is SOROS last billionaire standing for american youth's dream to unite sdg generation locally & globally
.zoomuni.net -breaking 2020 -zooming beyond reality- some nations 30 years behind our 1984 timelines for ai teaching/ studying - download and ask for our maps of whos leading
chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk may 2020 (bicycling distance from national institute of health bethesda md usa) writes:
since 1960 most of the world's population mapping sdg development - eg asians as over 60% of humans have traded round a japanese translation of global system- compounding solutions americans like deming and borlaug open sourced -more than any other single system dynamic friends at journalistsforhumanity have been able to map- brookings update 2020- 5/15 how taipei, seoul, hk, saved their peoples, and hanoi

back to middle of 20th c-perhaps it shouldn't be that much of a surprise that it took one of the 2 island nations that most colonised borders up to world war 2 to culturally rollback a higher purpose for uniting peoples
Back to www.normanmacrae.comSDG education revolutionCommentaryFriends and FamilyFuture HistoryBiographycoming - books.. diary 2020
.

Norman Macrae, having survived teenage navigation of RAF planes bomber command world war 2 over modern-day myanmar/bangladesh, joined The Economist in 1949, and retired as the deputy editor of what he called "the world's favourite viewspaper" in 1988. During that time, he wrote extensively on the future of society and the impact of technology. Norman foresaw species sustainability as being determined by post-colonial and virtual mapmaking- 5G 4G 3G 2G 1G 0G if 60s tech could race to moon and Moore alumni promised 100 times more machine intel every decade TO 2025, let's end poverty mediating/educating a world of loving each others' children- so that wherever the next millennials girl is born she enjoys great chance to thrive.

Soon Norman was celebrating his wartime enemy's rising engineers and win-win sme supply chains across far east and very concerned that tod down constitutions english speaking nations led by political bureaucrats wasn't fit for entrepreneurial revolution-he co-opted a young romani prodi to translate Economist 1976 ER survey into multilingual formats

Amongst some of his more outlandish claims: that governments would not only reverse the nationalisation process and denationalise formerly private industries, but would also sell industries and services that had been state operated for so long that it seemed impossible that they could be run by private companies. A pioneer before the pioneers, Macrae imagined privatised and competing telecommunications and utility companies improving service levels and reducing prices.

When others saw arms build-ups as heralding World War III, Macrae predicted the fall of the Berlin Wall by the end of the 1980's.

The Norman Macrae Archive serves as an on-line library, hosting a growing collection of Macrae articles, newspaper columns and highlights from his books. We hope that you find the articles thought provoking and zoom, twitter or question us - norman's son chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk



best wishes

1972 ecconomist survey of 1972-2012- WILL AMERICANS AND EUR-CITIZENS EVER BE FREED ENTREPRENEURIALLY FROM PAPER CURRENCIES THE ONLY ZERO-SUM TRADE MONOPLY IN A WORLD WHERE ACTIONABLE KNOWHOW MULTIPLIES VALUE UNLIKECONSUMING UP THING.....


help linkin sdg coalition maps- peru ...millennials rewind usa in 1999 afore 3G mobilisation decade- sample of cluetrain signees
| Saving the Internet—and all the commons it makes The ninth and worst enclosure is the one inside our heads. Because, if we think the Internet is something we use by grace of Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google and “providers” such as phone and cable companies, we’re only helping all those companies contain the Internet’s usefulness inside their walled gardens.
Not understanding the Internet can result in problems similar to ones

we suffer by not understanding common pool resources such as the atmosphere, the oceans, and the Earth itself.

chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk, normanmacrae.net quarters 5 and 6 of EconomistDiary 2018-1843 - journalists valuing mediation of goal 1 end poverty , A global databank for brandchartering the interconnecting aims of CLO, CBO and CEO in organising learning, branding and strategy - "I'd like to ask : Isn't it time that branders, strategists, and learning systems people believed and acted on their marketing promise as much as they want end-consumers to trust it? I am editing a millennial issue of a journal where we are urgently inviting world leading influencers of strategy, brand or learning to write 6 pages on future organisational frameworks in such simple language that every reader connects to the big idea whatever their home area of expertise"..........

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

badus media

...

Bob Corker | Foreign Policy

foreignpolicy.com/author/sen-bob-corker/
blindness to reconiliation with russia harms potentially positive policies esewhere

evil 49 and colts-worthless footballvalues

anycity with an opiod crisis needs radically new go eg dayton

As White House stumbles, foreign policy power rests with Tennessee's ...

www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/...foreign-policy...corker/331486001/

May 20, 2017 - A look into what role U.S. Sen. Bob Corker could play in terms of foreign policy.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Tweets

  1. macrae @obamauni  now
    america needs friendship russia 2 greatest carbon addicts help each other- build eurasia alaska bridge
x

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

http://www.nytimes.com/1985/04/02/books/books-of-the-times-135485.html

will congress destroy english-speaking youth last chance to co-create sdgoals

THE 2025 REPORT: A Concise History of
the Future 1975-2025. By Norman Macrae. 258 pages. Macmillan. $18.95. WHEN Gary Hart became President in 1988, he found himself confronted by a frightening situation. At his first major briefing from the Central Intelligence Agency, he learned that the most politically influential general in the Soviet Union had been bombarding his colleagues in the Kremlin with memos arguing that they should take advantage of their temporary position of strength and pursue a much more aggressive foreign policy, on the assumption that if they set the West a series of deliberate challenges an inexperienced American administration would be bound to run away from them.
All very scary, but fortunately there were members of the Politburo who were equally alarmed. One of them, Andrej Borovsky, sent a secret message to the President revealing that he and a group of colleagues planned to take power, but they could only hope to succeed if they had American support. Once their coup had succeeded, they would move as quickly as possible to introduce an open society and a free-market economy.
A cool customer, Borovsky. He had even thought things through to the point where he was skeptical about the likely benefits of economic aid; he was convinced that the part played by the Marshall Plan in the recovery of West Germany had been exaggerated, because ''it was the do-gooders' best excuse for explaining why brutal free markets worked.''
If his letter sometimes makes him sound suspiciously Westernized, it is not altogether a coincidence. Norman Macrae, who conjured him up, has been deputy editor of The Economist for the past 20 years, and almost everything in ''The 2025 Report'' has a touch of the breezy hyperconfident manner that that journal generally favors. Mr. Macrae is an old hand at the game of economic prophecy, and it should be said that he has had some outstanding successes in his time; he was one of the first, for example, to predict the postwar rise of Japan.
On this occasion he foresees a happy outcome. The Americans take a gamble on Borovsky, and ''the glorious and almost bloodless Russian counter-revolution of 1989-90'' is followed by a long period known as ''the gunboat years,'' during which the two superpowers exercise an increasing degree of global hegemony. This is frequently denounced as neo- colonialism, which it is - but it is also the only effective way of policing a world in which many states are ruled by despots who might well turn out to be crazy enough to use nuclear weapons.
Meanwhile, the Third World is still desperately poor, there is a looming possibility of conflict between North and South, and finally in the year 2005 a new American President who is called Roberta Kennedy (and how one wishes she weren't) sounds the alarm. Viewers throughout the world are invited to participate in a two- way television symposium, and several million tap in suggestions on their terminals. After computers have sifted the good ideas from the dross, the result is the creation of the ''Centrobank,'' a body empowered to supply the poorer countries with enough new foreign exchange to insure internal growth ''at the fastest possible non-inflationary pace but not by one penny faster.''
The Centrobank system is not only a triumphant success; it also leads to a rapid decline in the importance of governments, and of the nation state. And at this point Mr. Macrae switches from political science fiction to socioeconomic prediction; the rest of his book consists of a survey of the kind of world he thinks we can expect by 2025 if freedom and rationality are given a chance.
It will be a world of unprecedented abundance - thanks to such things as crop engineering, microbial mining, the cultivation of ''single cell protein'' - and a world of unprecedented freedom, in which people will be able to live more or less where they choose and ''telecommute'' to work. Children will be able to start work, if they want to, as soon as they have taken their ''Preliminary Exam'' (on average, at the age of 10 1/2; along with reading, writing, computer and so forth, the subjects tested will include ''emotional balance'' and ''civilized living''). Adults who have been studying or enjoying their leisure will be able to resume work at virtually any time, even in their 80's.
Along with many other advances in medicine and health care, genetic engineering - of a strictly nonsinister variety - will perform all kinds of miracles. (In one of the miniature biographies woven into the text, an Indonesian girl born without limbs acquires them through surgical ''tissue transformation'' - and goes on to win a gold medal for swimming in the Olympics.) Complicated brain scans will provide a safeguard against crime and potential insanity, particularly in public figures, and indeed it will be standard practice to send a printout of one's own scan to anyone with whom one has important dealings.
As utopias go, Mr. Macrae's seems to me reasonably plausible. But like most examples of the genre, it begs some large questions about power (will politics really wither away quite so easily?) and about the less attractive aspects of human nature (which are hard to expel even with the most scientific of pitchforks). And - again like most utopias - some of the goals that he assumes are desirable will strike many readers as repellent, or stultifying, or hopelessly banal. Those exams in civilized living, for instance, or his predictions about a flowering of the arts thanks to better opinion sampling, which could almost be mistaken for deliberate satire.
Still, he has written a lively, good- humored book, with a few nice quirky touches. And when he tells us that in 40 years' time alcohol consumption will virtually have disappeared, he is human enough to add, ''except for certain expensive wines.'' I was reminded of the character in one of Bernard Shaw's plays who was ''only a beer teetotaller, not a champagne teetotaller.''
photo of Norman Macrae
exciting news from shanghai summit of BRICS tarde mkinsters
lets open source curriculum of ecommerce we want across belt road

and open up one window portal demonstrating how up to 20 agencies at a birder can share same form

and invite world to join our expo to be hosted in beijing next year

cgtn video on this to come