.

Sunday, December 29, 2019

can americans ever recover win-win trading maps


A profitable student: America wants the World Bank to stop making loans to China

- Dec 14th 2019
THE CARIBBEAN islands of St. Kitts and Nevis are known for luxury tourism (visitors include Meryl Streep and Oprah Winfrey), pricey citizenship (on sale for $150,000), and a sprint world champion (Kim Collins). But despite the country’s many assets (including a national income per person of over $18,000) it is eligible for loans from the World Bank, an institution dedicated to eradicating extreme poverty.
Because the islands are so small, this draws little comment. Not so for China. Its income per person is half that of St. Kitts and Nevis, and lower than that of Poland, Malaysia, Turkey and 15 other potential borrowers. But its eligibility to borrow from the World Bank strikes many Americans as anomalous, even scandalous.
One of them is President Donald Trump. “Why is the World Bank loaning money to China? Can this be possible?” he tweeted on December 6th, a day after the bank discussed a new five-year lending framework for America’s rival. Another used to be the World Bank’s president, David Malpass, in his former job as an American treasury official. In 2017 he argued that “it doesn’t make sense to have money borrowed…using the US government guarantee, going into lending in China”. Steven Mnuchin, the treasury secretary, heard similar sentiments in a congressional hearing on December 5th. “What are you doing to stop those loans?” asked a Democrat. “It’s unconscionable to me that our taxpayers should...be subsidising the Chinese growth model,” said a Republican. On this question, at least, America’s legislature is almost as harmonious as its Chinese counterpart.
America had objected to the new framework, Mr Mnuchin said. But it cannot have surprised him. In a deal struck last year, America agreed to an increase in the bank’s capital, in return for which the bank agreed to charge its richer borrowers higher interest rates, lend to them more sparingly and encourage more of them to “graduate” (ie, cease to be eligible for the bank’s loans).
But graduating from the bank is like graduating from a German university: neither brisk nor uniform; leaving behind many dauerstudenten (eternal students). Once a country reaches a national income of $6,975 per person, a “discussion” begins. The bank also considers a country’s access to capital markets and the quality of its institutions. Of the 17 countries that have graduated since 1973, five later sank back into eligibility, according to a study by the Policy Centre for the New South, a Moroccan think-tank. South Korea left in 1995, then needed the bank’s help in the Asian financial crisis. It remained eligible for further loans until 2016, when its income per person was almost three times China’s current level.
The bank will, however, lend to China more selectively. The country now owes it about $14.7bn. Over the next five years, it envisages lending $1bn-1.5bn a year, 15-40% less than it averaged in 2015-19. The new money aims to encourage fiscal reforms, private enterprise, social spending and environmental improvements. If the bank can help nudge China towards cleaner growth that will benefit everyone, including China’s geopolitical rivals. It also hopes to finance pilot projects that poorer countries can learn from. It has paid for Ethiopian officials to study China’s irrigation and Indian officials to study its trains.
But would the money not be better spent in poorer countries themselves? The bank’s friends point out that its lending to China earns a tidy profit (roughly $100m last year). It charges China a higher interest rate than it pays on its own borrowing. That is money that can then be used to help poor people who live elsewhere.
In theory, its donor governments could do all this more cheaply and simply themselves. They could issue an equivalent amount of low-yielding sovereign bonds, buy higher-yielding emerging-market securities and donate any profits to low-income countries. But that is not what critics of China’s lending are proposing.
Given the profits it can earn, the bank is eager to keep lending to China. Harder to explain is why China wants to keep borrowing from the bank. The sums are small (0.01% of GDP) and the process can be cumbersome. China may value the bank’s expertise. But if so, why not buy it without a loan attached?
There are examples of China doing just that. It bought advice on how to improve in the bank’s assessment of the ease of doing business. But China may feel a loan gives the bank more skin in the game. Consultants paid only for advice can always blame disappointments on poor implementation of their sound prescriptions. A lender has a greater stake in solving difficulties. Institutions like the bank and the IMF stress the importance of borrowers taking “ownership” of reform programmes. China may feel the same about the lenders it deigns to borrow from.
Print Pages
US Pages: 
66 65
UK Pages: 
62 61
EU Pages: 
60 59
AP Pages: 
62 61
Print Issue Volume: 
433
Print Issue Number: 
9173
… 

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

This project analyzes the major dynamics at play in an era of new geopolitics and offer ideas and strategies to guide critical countries and key leaders on how they should act to preserve and renovate the established international order to secure peace and prosperity for another generation.
The U.S. technology sector continues to grow rapidly, driving the nation’s innovation and overall economic growth. However, technology companies are concentrated in only a few very high-cost hubs, such as Silicon Valley, Boston, and Seattle—creating a “winner-take-most” regional reality. The result is not only reduced U.S. competitiveness but increasing regional inequality and lost opportunity in the heartland. And this gap is still widening.
It is time for the federal government to act. Policymakers should support a national competition to select as many as 10 emerging metropolitan areas to receive a decade-long range of robust policy supports, enabling their transition into self-sustaining, globally competitive innovation hubs.
Please join the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program and Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) for a presentation on this detailed proposal for action. Honorary co-hosts Sens. Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Jerry Moran (R-Kan.), who co-chair the Senate Competitiveness Caucus, will discuss the relevance and timeliness of the proposal.
Follow @ITIFdc and @BrookingsMetro and join the discussion on Twitter with the hashtag #SpreadTechHubs

Saturday, November 23, 2019

14.0m
Members
5.3k
Online
Feb 14, 2012
Cake Day
A place for visual representations of data: Graphs, charts, maps, etc. DataIsBeautiful is for visualizations that effectively convey information. Aesthetics are an important part of information visualization, but pretty pictures are not the aim of this subreddit.

sample from data is beautiful

The Elevation of Los Angeles [OC]

Post image
328 Comments
93% Upvoted
Comment asc1975222

Switch to markdown
SORT BY
level 1
623 points·8 hours ago
Fun fact, William Wrigley bought and wanted to turn Catalina island into the “Monaco of the West Coast” but the beaches and coasts of catalina are too shallow for the giant boats he wanted to be able to dock at the ports. For a while he didn’t know what to do with the island and had the Cubs use it as a practice facility for a while.
Today it’s a great place to day drink and get hammered with the locals
level 2
192 points·8 hours ago
Also a great place to go see wild (not native but wild) bison left over from a movie in the 1920s, drive golf carts, and scuba dive!
level 3
Oh that sounded way more fun without commas. I'd book a flight right now if I could see bison scuba dive.
level 4
46 points·5 hours ago·edited 1 hour ago
I'm picturing myself sitting at a beach bar when a bison in full scuba gear drives a topless golf cart right into the ocean. Yakety yak playing in the background.
level 5
You know some wacky shit like that has probably been close to happening or has happened.
level 6
Score hidden·55 minutes ago
Fuckin' Catalina Wine Mixer!
level 3
I read this comment and decided to look that up, when led me to the Catalina island wikipedia page. The wikipedia page listed all the fauna on Catalina island, which includes feral goats. "What are feral goats?" I asked myself as I decided to learn more. This led to about 15 minutes of learning about various breeds of goats. I thought you would find it funny that your comment led someone to learn about the various breeds of goats.
By then way, google "boer goat". It's a popular breed for meat production because of its higher muscle mass and its ability to breed quickly. I thought they looked pretty cool.
level 4
"boer goat"
Boer means farmer in Dutch.
It refers to the Afrikaners who, because of their agricultural background in the colonization of Southern Africa, are also called "Boer".