Is SOROS last billionaire standing for american youth's dream to unite sdg generation locally & globally
.zoomuni.net -breaking 2020 -zooming beyond reality- some nations 30 years behind our 1984 timelines for ai teaching/ studying - download and ask for our maps of whos leading
chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk may 2020 (bicycling distance from national institute of health bethesda md usa) writes:
since 1960 most of the world's population mapping sdg development - eg asians as over 60% of humans have traded round a japanese translation of global system- compounding solutions americans like deming and borlaug open sourced -more than any other single system dynamic friends at journalistsforhumanity have been able to map- brookings update 2020- 5/15 how taipei, seoul, hk, saved their peoples, and hanoi

back to middle of 20th c-perhaps it shouldn't be that much of a surprise that it took one of the 2 island nations that most colonised borders up to world war 2 to culturally rollback a higher purpose for uniting peoples
Back to www.normanmacrae.comSDG education revolutionCommentaryFriends and FamilyFuture HistoryBiographycoming - books.. diary 2020
.

Norman Macrae, having survived teenage navigation of RAF planes bomber command world war 2 over modern-day myanmar/bangladesh, joined The Economist in 1949, and retired as the deputy editor of what he called "the world's favourite viewspaper" in 1988. During that time, he wrote extensively on the future of society and the impact of technology. Norman foresaw species sustainability as being determined by post-colonial and virtual mapmaking- 5G 4G 3G 2G 1G 0G if 60s tech could race to moon and Moore alumni promised 100 times more machine intel every decade TO 2025, let's end poverty mediating/educating a world of loving each others' children- so that wherever the next millennials girl is born she enjoys great chance to thrive.

Soon Norman was celebrating his wartime enemy's rising engineers and win-win sme supply chains across far east and very concerned that tod down constitutions english speaking nations led by political bureaucrats wasn't fit for entrepreneurial revolution-he co-opted a young romani prodi to translate Economist 1976 ER survey into multilingual formats

Amongst some of his more outlandish claims: that governments would not only reverse the nationalisation process and denationalise formerly private industries, but would also sell industries and services that had been state operated for so long that it seemed impossible that they could be run by private companies. A pioneer before the pioneers, Macrae imagined privatised and competing telecommunications and utility companies improving service levels and reducing prices.

When others saw arms build-ups as heralding World War III, Macrae predicted the fall of the Berlin Wall by the end of the 1980's.

The Norman Macrae Archive serves as an on-line library, hosting a growing collection of Macrae articles, newspaper columns and highlights from his books. We hope that you find the articles thought provoking and zoom, twitter or question us - norman's son chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk



best wishes

1972 ecconomist survey of 1972-2012- WILL AMERICANS AND EUR-CITIZENS EVER BE FREED ENTREPRENEURIALLY FROM PAPER CURRENCIES THE ONLY ZERO-SUM TRADE MONOPLY IN A WORLD WHERE ACTIONABLE KNOWHOW MULTIPLIES VALUE UNLIKECONSUMING UP THING.....


help linkin sdg coalition maps- peru ...millennials rewind usa in 1999 afore 3G mobilisation decade- sample of cluetrain signees
| Saving the Internet—and all the commons it makes The ninth and worst enclosure is the one inside our heads. Because, if we think the Internet is something we use by grace of Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google and “providers” such as phone and cable companies, we’re only helping all those companies contain the Internet’s usefulness inside their walled gardens.
Not understanding the Internet can result in problems similar to ones

we suffer by not understanding common pool resources such as the atmosphere, the oceans, and the Earth itself.

chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk, normanmacrae.net quarters 5 and 6 of EconomistDiary 2018-1843 - journalists valuing mediation of goal 1 end poverty , A global databank for brandchartering the interconnecting aims of CLO, CBO and CEO in organising learning, branding and strategy - "I'd like to ask : Isn't it time that branders, strategists, and learning systems people believed and acted on their marketing promise as much as they want end-consumers to trust it? I am editing a millennial issue of a journal where we are urgently inviting world leading influencers of strategy, brand or learning to write 6 pages on future organisational frameworks in such simple language that every reader connects to the big idea whatever their home area of expertise"..........

Friday, November 30, 2018

that was the argentina g20 that was

whilst taking place in buenos aires through dec 2 - we will devote november 2018 to content on what worldwide sustainability issues argentina seized or missed at a time when trade wars seem to be designed to destroy youth and women's hope that we are truly living in the era of sustainability goals

there's a feeling that the donald lives on a different planet than mother earth however if he unites the koreas he will at least have achieved one leap for peace that no 21st c us president has got close to- frankly unless usa addresses its false media problems which have been rife in mass as well as digital forms the chances of any us leader restoring us goodwill around the world in time for sustainability's lead deadlines look dismally small - where does this leave the whole of latin america-

more of the world and maps to and form sustainainable world trade latiun america at
#BR0 why leaders plan for china gdp double usa by 2030 whatever trump does
@BR6 #TheEconomist do americans want to save humans from extinction?
#BR10 latin america
#BR9 africa calling
news blockchain & edu belt road
women for sustainability zero trust g7 lead timely goals- whether g20 trusted might have been staged at franciscan g20 but may have to wait to japan g20 given argentina's own needs

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Friday, November 30, 2018
 
A Onetime White House and Wall Street Darling, Argentina Feels Jilted by Bolsonaro Buzz


On the night of the Brazilian election, Argentine President Mauricio Macri sent well wishes to the president-elect. “Congratulations to Jair Bolsonaro for your win in Brazil!” he tweeted. “I hope we will work together soon for the relationship between our countries and the wellbeing of Argentines and Brazilians.” Later, Mr. Macri called his future counterpart and invited him to visit Argentina.

Despite that outreach, Mr. Bolsonaro broke with tradition and decided that his first foreign visit as president-elect would be to Chile, not Argentina. “Chile is the great Latin American model,” he explained. “It has a good education system, it develops technologies and it trades with the whole world.” Brazil’s future finance minister, Paulo Guedes, was even more blunt. “Argentina is not a priority,” he said.

Though Mr. Guedes later apologized, his insult heighted the sense of unease in Buenos Aires over the implications of Mr. Bolsonaro’s unexpected political rise.

Even before the Brazilian election, Argentina had faced an uncertain political and economic future heading into next year’s election. It is suffering its worst recession since 2001, and Mr. Macri’s decision to solicit International Monetary Fund assistance undermined his strategy to balance the budget gradually and at minimal political and social cost. Low growth, high inflation and spending cuts have cut into the president’s popularity and robbed him of his political capital. Though lawmakers recently approved his proposed budget for 2019, Mr. Macri’s legislative agenda has otherwise ground to a halt, including labor reform.

Now, enthusiasm for Mr. Bolsonaro’s promised reforms is making Argentine authorities even more anxious. The South American neighbors like to portray themselves as partners, they are also rivals, and not only on the soccer field. The two giants compete for geopolitical influence, export markets and foreign investment. For these reasons, some in Argentina feel pressured by Mr. Bolsonaro’s commitment to deepen the reforms of Brazil’s outgoing Temer administration.

Mr. Bolsonaro, a hard-right nationalist, has drawn scorn from international human rights organizations for his troubling comments about minority groups, and his nostalgia for Brazil’s dictatorship. But he has earned cautious optimism from investors; his October election led to a rally for the Brazilian currency and stock market. One reason for this enthusiasm is Mr. Guedes, the University of Chicago-trained economist who will serve as a Domingo Cavallo-style super minister, and who has been an outspoken proponent of deficit reductionpension reform; and opening Brazil’s notoriously closed economy. Mr. Bolsonaro also plans to name apro-privatization economist to run Brazil’s state-owned oil company, Petrobras, and to demote Brazil’s once powerful labor ministry to a secretariat, likely under Mr. Guedes’s supervision. Investors hope the reforms, including tax cuts, will strengthen Brazil’s fragile recovery from its deep recession in 2014.

There are doubts about how much Mr. Bolsonaro can accomplish without a congressional majority. Moreover, if Mr. Bolsonaro manages to eliminate Brazil’s deficit in two years, Brazil likely will experience another recession, which could sap support for his administration. Still, for Argentina, the prospect of substantial economic reforms in Brazil, a far larger market, is nerve-racking. Should Brazil falter, it would reduce demand for Argentine goods in Argentina’s largest export market. Should Brazil succeed, it could divert foreign investment, and highlight Mr. Macri’s failure to reform Argentina’s protectionist and anti-competitive labor and industrial policies.

On trade, Mr. Bolsonaro’s skepticism about Mercosur – his team hascriticized the bloc as a “hindrance to free trade” – could bolster Mr. Macri’s efforts to promote free trade agreements between Mercosur and its partners, such as the European Union. But it could also lead Mr. Bolsonaro to abandon the bloc and implement unilateral reductions in tariffs that would deeply harm Argentine competitiveness in the Brazilian market. Argentina could stand to lose even more if Brazil revisits the Argentine-Brazilian auto pact, which was recently renegotiatedThe economic relationship between Argentina and Brazil depends a great deal upon goodwill between the two countries’ presidents.

The new Brazilian government also threatens to diminish Argentina’s geopolitical clout. Mr.  Bolsonaro’s admiration for Mr. Trump has clearly won over the National Security Council. John Bolton, Mr. Trump’s national security adviser, dedicated much of his November 2 Latin America speech to attacking the governments in Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela. But he paused to celebrate the election of Mr. Bolsonaro, whom he called a “likeminded” leader. Mr. Bolton also mentioned the U.S. partnership with Argentina, but his embrace of Brazil led one Argentine analyst, Francisco de SantibaƱes, from the Consejo Argentino para las Relaciones Internacionales (CARI), to lament that, “Buenos Aires will not be able to receive the same kind of privileged treatment it has received so far.”

Mr. Bolsonaro’s election was hardly the first external development to threaten Mr. Macri’s reform agenda.

When Mr. Macri was elected in 2015, the liberal international order seemed secure, cradled by internationalists such as Barack Obama, Angela Merkel and Justin Trudeau. As Mr. Macri sought to reintegrate Argentina into the international community, both politically and economically, the world seemed to be moving in the same direction. For a time, the outside world rewarded Mr. Macri. Mr. Obama visited Buenos Aires in 2016, and investors followed closely behind, lending the billions of dollars necessary to permit a gradual reduction in public spending. (In all, Argentina’s government borrowed $161 billion in its first two years in office, including through a 100-year bond issued last year.)

But in time, the global environment turned hostile. Hillary Clinton lost the 2016 U.S. election to a trade skeptic, whose protectionist policies shut out Argentine biodiesel – its top export to the United States – from the U.S. market. Meanwhile, rising interest rates increased concerns about Argentina’s budget deficit and its pile of dollar-denominated debt, leading to capital flight earlier this year and a rapid peso devaluation.

So far, Mr. Macri’s government has survived this tumult, though not without a few bruises.

Significantly, he has preserved the close relationship with the United States that he established under Mr. Obama. That was not as simple as it seems. Beyond the policy disagreements with the Trump administration – ranging from commerce to climate – there was also bad blood. Most analysts assumed Mr. Macri and Mr. Trump, as businessmen turned politicians, would be simpatico. But in fact, the Macri and Trump families had once competed bitterly over a New York City real estate deal in the 1980s. Nevertheless. Mr. Macri and Mr. Trump appear to get along personally. Mr. Trump, for example, has been a vocal supporter of Argentina, backing the IMF bailout and Argentina’s membership in the OECD.

Now, as Argentina awaits the January 1 inauguration of another populist outsider, this time in Brazil, it remains to be seen how the Argentine government will manage its latest international surprise.

For more analysis on the potential impacts of Jair Bolsonaro’s election for Latin America, read our piece in World Politics Review, “If Brazil Elects Bolsonaro, Venezuela’s Migration Crisis Will Get Even Worse.”


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For more Argentina insights, and to keep up with Argentina Project events — such as our discussion on Argentina’s macroeconomic challenges — follow us on Twitter (@ArgentinaProj), where we also highlight our publications and activities — such as our recent conversation on Argentinas economic crisis with Argentine presidential candidate Sergio Massa, and launch of the ArgentinaPulse national survey — and announce new podcast episodes.
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Wednesday, November 14, 2018

can us cities ever become SDG economic zones


7:41


yesterday's announcement by amazon put the cat among the pigeons so to speak- if new york and dc can become cities sustainability youth value in the top 20 suoercities= what use is USA as far as  mother earth or the species human is concerned?  here's is one of dc's first dialgues in the post amazon hq2 world - 

Brookings Event Invitation

U.S. cities in pursuit of viable futures: Taking on the Sustainable Development Goals

Thursday, November 29, 2018, 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
The Brookings Institution, Saul/Zilkha Room, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20036
RSVP to attend in person
With political divisions on the rise and global cooperation imperiled, city officials worldwide are stepping up to lead, solving local problems while sharing solutions and innovations across borders. Making cities such as New York, Pittsburgh, and Los Angeles inclusive, safe, and sustainable is vital to the future of the United States--and the globe. Driven by the need to act locally while thinking globally, a growing number of metro areas are adapting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a blueprint for progress.

On November 29, the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings and Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy will co-host an event with city officials and development experts to explore the value proposition of the SDGs for U.S. cities. Experts will explore how the 17 SDGs can help cities tackle local economic, political, and environmental challenges vital to the health and wellbeing of their residents. They will debate how U.S. cities can lead and reach the global goals by 2030.

New York City and Los Angeles are publicly promoting and implementing the SDGs, while cities such as Pittsburgh are leading on innovation and sustainability but have not yet connected their strategies to the SDGs. Panelists will also explore how technology can help integrate the SDGs into city strategies and accelerate development gains.

Following the discussion, panelists will take questions from the audience.
Introduction and moderator
Anthony F. Pipa, Senior Fellow, Global Economy and Development, The Brookings Institution | @anthonypipa
Panelists
Penny Abeywardena, Commissioner for International Affairs, Mayor's Office, City of New York | @PAbeywardenaGrant Ervin, Chief Resilience Officer, City of Pittsburgh | @ervin_grantNina Hachigian, Deputy Mayor, City of Los Angeles | @ninahachigianKaren Lightman, Executive Director, Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College Metro21 Smart Cities Institute | @khlightman
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legend of supercities and sustainability world trade belt road mapping

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

amazonuni.com #br6 #theeconomist tale of 2 citizens in dmv -eleana number 1 heroine, bezos who knows?

  1. amazon hq2 = something wrong capitalism US characteristics?Bezos made enough money to choose half of Hq2 NY-DC-VA for SDG impact - compare jack ma who has designed ecommerce and efinance to give back- blog
  2. I've treated patients in the ER who have died from gun shot wounds. How can anyone say this isn't a health issue?