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Roughly half of world comprises four by 1 billion: girls, young women. mothers, grandmoms- HYPOTHESIS 2020s economistamerica.com needs now to celebrate freedom of young metoo lives matter. Try to stay out of the way of Men's supreme triad Donald , Vladamir, Yong. Maths at Codesmeta.com.Dad, The Economist's Norman Macrae would have been 100 in 2023 (see below Glasgow celebration MES). Da'ds first trip to USA: 1951 year secondemnt by The Economist. He met Von Neumann: they agreed greatest sccopp journalists would ever mediate - what GOOD will peoples do with 100 times more tech every decade : 1930s to 2020s. GOD measnt a lot to both men- Von Neumann had less than 6 years left to deliver good tech legacy from the Goats of maths (including Einstein, Turing); these immigramnts had aminly been forced to work on the bad of nucleasr weapons; my dad had spent his last dayas as a teen in bomber command naviagting airplanes our of Burma; as well as survival his good fortune mapsd of the old woirld's tri-contiment in his head; notably the indo pacific whose coastline three quarters of humans depended on for world trade but which particularly britain had enginee4rd to enrich the west and trap asians in poverty- still with 100 times more good tech to go round - could everyone win-win; for example webbing life critical knowhow locally multiplies value in use unlike consuming up things. HOW DID DAD FOLLOW UP Neuman's Gift. He chered on twin AI Labs facing pacific out of stanford (eg see 10th birthday celebration of place branded silicon valley) and facing atlantic out of MIT. His bio of V neuman has been published in American and japanese. He wrote over 2000 anonymous leaders for The Economist and aged 39 was permitted one signed survey a year. You can see ost of tehse at tecahforsdgs.com- what did he write about? In the 1960s countries whose peoples had worried him most -starting with the Jpanese he had bomber consider Jpana 1962 (Russia 1963, latin Am 1964 , Algeria & S SAfrica; he concluded 1960s interviwing how dismally different Nixon's economit admin had been from jfk - the least national leader to celebartae with youyth 100 times more (moon race, mapping worldwide interdependence).Ironically Neumann's computational gift was sperading a macroeconomic numbers man whose systems compounded opposite of sustainability. Rather than argue with american academai- dad rebranded his purpose as future historian and entrepreneurial revolutionary. Still the main question search through 70s and up to 83 wgat good 100 times more. Then to offere a diferent end game to orewell's big brother we co-austhored from 18=984 2025 reports- -webs we expected to be designed from 1990; opportumities and threats of milennials first quarter centiry - the first sustainability generation or the first extintion generation. Join in the final tipping points now- support UN2.0 ,educatirs on web3 and metaverse, indsutrial revolution 4, society 5.0 depending which culture you come from and whether you traingularise valuation of 8 billion beings by corpoiarte ESG , civil society emwpoermemnt or what gov2.0 does gov

Tuesday, November 13, 2018



New Yorkers reacted to the news that Amazon was coming to town with roughly the same amount of enthusiasm that Tory MPs showed for Theresa May's Brexit deal.
  • It's not a Brexit-level fiasco: The politicians who negotiated the deal, for instance, didn't immediately resign in order to protest the deal they negotiated, a la Brexit secretary Dominic Raab.
  • Still, politicians immediately realized that their constituents did not consider this a win. What looks like a lovely new source of income tax to City Hall (25,000 workers making an average of $150,000 apiece) looks more like a source of inequality and gentrification to the people currently living in Long Island City, many of whom were looking forward to that land becoming affordable housing.
The similarity between Brexit and Amazon HQ is that voters are increasingly vocal in speaking out against systems that are seen to benefit the wealthy elite first and foremost.
Amazon vs. Google: On Dan Primack's Pro Rata podcast, New York Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen said that the city drove a hard bargain with Amazon, forcing the company to open up its new campus to all New Yorkers, rather than closing it off for employees only.
  • The fact that Amazon was reluctant to make that concession is a stark contrast to Google, which has quietly bought up more than 6 million square feet of non-campus New York real estate — enough to support some 20,000 highly paid workers.
  • Amazon likes flashy buildings; Google, by contrast, for all the space it owns in New York, is largely invisible.
  • Google has neither requested nor received any kind of tax-break sweeteners from New York. That means it's getting roughly $3 billion less than Amazon. (Surviving bad press in Toronto, it turns out, is much easier.)
The bottom line: Amazon has created a lot of ill will by setting city against city in a cruel and elaborate HQ2 game. That's not a great way to make friends in a world where mistrust of Big Tech is at record highs.
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3. Facebook's executive trainwreck
Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios
Facebook had even worse press than Amazon this week, thanks mainly to a devastating New York Times article on Wednesday.
The focus of the story is the manner in which Facebook's top two executives — Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg — react to bad news. Rather than deal with it directly, they tend, in the words of the article's headline, to "delay, deny and deflect."
  • The conclusion: "Bent on growth, the pair ignored warning signs and then sought to conceal them from public view."
Facebook also hired Definers, an opposition-research specialist in Washington, in a move that ended up backfiring spectacularly. Zuckerberg now denies (implausibly) that either he or Sandberg had ever heard of Definers before the Times article appeared.
Facebook shares closed at $139.53 on Friday, down 36% from their high of $218.62 in July, less than 4 months ago. That's a loss of $228 billion in market capitalization and a sign that the market has lost faith in Facebook's executive leadership.
  • Zuckerberg's attempt on Thursday to mollify the market and the press was predictably unsuccessful.
  • I made the case in April that Zuckerberg is no longer the right person to lead Facebook. His product and engineering skills are prodigious yet also irrelevant, and by Zuckerberg's own admission, neither he nor Sandberg are fully aware of what's going on internally.
Facebook's board has neither the ability nor the inclination to fire Zuckerberg. But that doesn't mean he can't resign as CEO. At any point, he is free to hand the reins over to someone with a better intuitive understanding of why governments and users around the world are so upset at the company (hint: patent applications like this one don't help) and what needs to be done to fix the problem.
The bottom line: Facebook has lurched from crisis to crisis, and it has managed none of those crises well. It's now clear who bears the blame for that.

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